Blood > Water

I read the other day that the quote “blood is thicker than water” was originally used to reference the blood shed during a war compared to the blood we share with family. So in essence, we’ve been getting it wrong for decades- giving the words the exact opposite meaning that they  were intended for.

The words become stronger this way. They solidify that sometimes our family- our own blood will let us down. Boy, have I learned that lesson recently. But those that shed their own DNA as they struggle through the daily battle of life right along next to us, they are the ones we reach to for help more often than not.

As we move into older childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, we surround ourselves not by family, but by peers of our age, experience, and goals. We interact with those we have similarities to and who can provide support academically, financially, professionally, emotionally, etc. Because of the similar trajectories of humans we surround ourselves with as we grow, we tend to experience similar triumphs and similar disappointments.

We climb similar mountains and refer to others fighting the same battles when we can’t support ourselves entirely. We shed blood, sweat, and tears daily trying to navigate through life and the obstacles within it. Our DNA will always remain part of the fight but it is the reliance on others who are fighting the same war, overcoming the same challenges, that help us persevere through life as we do each day.

So which interpreation is most meaningful to you? The blood within us or the blood we help to clot from wounds of the fighters next to us each day? Blood certainly is thicker than water but what do you mean when you say it?

 

 

*my reference is a Wikipedia article which should not be taken as a reliable source of information but nonetheless, an intriguing interpretation of a well-used phrase I wanted to share*

 

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brennabeluga

Just a lost soul trying to make sense of the world

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